Transitioning small employers to self-funding strategies

This article was published on September 4, 2018 on BenefitsPro, written by Cort Olsen.

Source: BenefitsPro

With premiums constantly on the rise for employers offering fully insured health plans, brokers are searching for ways to convince their small and mid-size clients that switching to self funding can cut costs on their top line items.

Switching to one of these plans means that the employer assumes more risk, with stop-loss insurance providing financial protection against catastrophic claims. They can also pay medical claims as incurred as they would other corporate expenses, or can deposit expected or maximum costs into an account each month.

There are many ways brokers are going about convincing their clients to make the leap, from educating them on the cost of the medical loss ratio, highlighting the financial pressure health care is placing on their business, or just making them feel as uncomfortable as possible by explaining their fully insured payment methods.

Bob Gearhart Jr., partner at benefits brokerage DCW Group in Boardman, Ohio, says explaining the MLR and how it guarantees fully insured premiums will rise is a great starting point when initiating the conversation.

“Benefits is one of the few areas the CFO has not optimized and they are feeling pressure from the CEO to drive earnings to the bottom line,” Gearhart says. “This organizational pressure coupled with health care in the headlines is slowly changing the buyer within the organization.”

Gearhart adds that leading HR professionals recognize this and proactively engage the C-suite in the buying decision.

Robson Baker, employee benefits and HR adviser for Clarus Benefits Group in Houston, Texas, says getting the C-suite and HR through the awareness phase of the conversation is the hardest part.

“The broker needs to educate and bring the pain points to the forefront of their minds,” Baker says. “Then it moves to consideration — which can be led by a strategic CFO and compassionate HR department.”

Framing health care cost as a financial decision allows the broker to approach the CFO first and then bring the self funding plan down to HR and out to the other employees. Continue reading

How clients can help curb healthcare costs during open enrollment

This article was published on August 29, 2018 on Employee Benefit Adviser, written by Rebecca Madsen.

Technology continues to reshape how employers select and offer healthcare benefits to employees, putting access to information at our fingertips and creating a more seamless and interactive healthcare experience. At the same time, these advances may help employees become savvier users of healthcare, helping simplify and personalize their journey toward health and, in the process, help curb costs for employers.

The revolution can be important to remember during open enrollment, which occurs during the fall, when millions of Americans select or switch their health benefits for 2019. With that in mind, here are five tips employers should be aware of during open enrollment and year-round.

enrollment brochure

Make sense of big data. Big data is a buzz word, but the applications are only meaningful if employers can make sense of that information. To help with that, employers are gaining access to online resources to help enable them to more easily analyze and make sense of health data, taking into account aggregate medical and prescription claims, demographics, and clinical and well-being information. This can provide an analytics-driven roadmap to help employers implement tailored clinical management and employee engagement programs, which may help improve health outcomes, mitigate expenses and help employees take charge of their health.

Help people understand their options. More than three-quarters (77%) of employees say they are prepared for open enrollment, yet most people struggle to understand basic health insurance terms, according to a recent UnitedHealthcare survey. In fact, only 6% of survey respondents could successfully define all four basic health insurance concepts: plan premium, deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximum. To support employees during open enrollment, employers can adopt online platforms designed to personalize and simplify the experience to help people select a health plan based on their personal health and financial preferences, while encouraging them to select a primary care physician and enroll in programs such as smoking cessation or weight loss.

Encourage your people to move more. An estimated 35% of employers now integrate wearable devices into their well-being programs, helping employees more accurately understand their daily activity levels. As these programs become more common, there may be opportunities for cost savings for companies and their workforce. For instance, some wearable device wellness programs may enable people to earn more than $1,000 per year by meeting certain daily walking goals, while employers can achieve premium renewal discounts based on the aggregate walking results of their employees.

Offer incentives to employees who comparison shop for care. More than one-third (36%) of Americans say they have used the internet or mobile apps during the last year to comparison shop for healthcare, up from 14% in 2012, according to the UnitedHealthcare survey. To encourage employees to participate in this trend, some employers are offering financial incentives — such as $25 or $50 gift cards — to employees for using healthcare transparency resources. Healthcare quality and cost varies widely within a city or neighborhood, so encouraging the use of online and mobile transparency resources may yield savings for employers and employees.

Integrate medical and ancillary benefits. Open enrollment is also the time for people to select important ancillary benefits, such as vision and dental coverage. While some people may overlook these plans, offering this coverage as part of an employee’s menu of benefits options may maximize the effectiveness of a company’s healthcare dollars, provide families with added peace of mind and help build a culture of health. Combining medical and ancillary benefits under a single health plan may enable for the integrated analysis of a wide range of data that can facilitate proactive outreach and clinical support for employees, including for people with chronic conditions such as diabetes, or to help prevent the development of such conditions.

controlling-costs

For 2019, Employers Adjust Health Benefits as Costs Near $15,000 per Employee

This article was published on August 13, 2018 on SHRM.org, written by Stephen Miller.

Plans are steering employees toward expanded telehealth options and high-value centers of excellence

With the cost of employer-sponsored health care benefits expected to approach $15,000 per employee next year, large U.S. employers continue to make changes, new research reveals.

Many want to hold down cost increases and are steering employees toward cost-effective service providers, such as telehealth options and high-value in-plan provider networks, according to the nonprofit National Business Group on Health (NBGH) survey 2019 Large Employers’ Health Care Strategy and Plan Design. The survey was conducted from May to June with 170 large employers as they finalized their 2019 health plan choices; more than 60 percent of respondents belong to the Fortune 500.

Cost Increases Hold Steady

Big employers project that their total cost of providing medical and pharmacy benefits will rise 5 percent for the sixth consecutive year in 2019. If they weren’t making benefit changes, their costs would rise 6 percent, the survey showed.

The total cost of health care, including premiums and out-of-pocket costs for employees and dependents, is estimated to average $14,800 per employee in 2019, up from $14,099 this year. Large employers will cover roughly 70 percent of those costs, leaving $4,400 on average for employees to pick up in premium contributions and out-of-pocket expenses.

Health benefit costs are still rising at two times the rate of wage increases and three times general inflation, “making this [cost] trend unaffordable and unsustainable over the long term,” Brian Marcotte, NBGH president and CEO, said at an Aug. 7 press conference in Washington, D.C.

cost-increases-hold-steady-graphic

Consumer-Directed Health Plans

“The most unexpected data point in the survey this year is that employers are dialing back their move to consumer-directed health plans”―or CDHPs―especially as a full replacement for other health plan options, Marcotte said. CDHPs typically combine a high-deductible health insurance plan with a tax-advantaged account that employees can use to pay for medical expenses, most commonly a health savings account (HSA) or health reimbursement arrangement.

“We may be at a tipping point in terms of cost-sharing with employees,” Marcotte said.

In 2019, the number of employers offering CDHPs as a sole option will drop by 9 percent, from 39 percent to 30 percent, “reflecting a move by employers to add more choice back into the mix” by also offering traditional health plans such as preferred-provider organizations, he noted.

To lessen the pain of high deductibles while maintaining incentives for cost-conscious spending, large employers are contributing to their employees’ HSAs, on average, $500 for an individual and $2,000 for a family, NBGH found.

The shift to CDHPs as a sole option over the last decade was driven, in part, by the Affordable Care Act and its 40 percent “Cadillac tax” on high-value health plans, originally to take effect in 2018, Marcotte said. “A lot of companies moved to high-deductible health plans to minimize the impact of the Cadillac tax or to delay its impact, but the Cadillac tax has been kicked down the road, first  to 2020 and now to 2022,” Marcotte said. Many believe it may be further delayed or repealed altogether, “so employers are relaxing” about the need to reduce the scope of their plans. Continue reading

Helping with Prescription Adherence

doctorWhile prescribed medications are critical to the management of chronic illnesses such as diabetes, asthma or heart disease, they can only help when taken correctly and research shows that at least half are not taken as prescribed. This not only has a huge impact on the health of individuals but on health plan costs since failure to take medications as prescribed can result in costly emergency room visits and hospital readmissions.

Since failing to follow a doctor’s prescription plan will likely result in higher dollar claims for treatment, examining claims data is the first step to take in order to monitor this problem. Once the employees involved are identified, a health coach or support team can be assigned to help these individuals begin managing and taking their medications correctly. If cost is an issue, which is fairly common in the case of chronic problems, financial incentives or help with prescription copays might be wise.

ebso-self-funding-works

 

Reference Based Pricing Gaining

ebso-rpbWhile plenty of folks talk about reference based pricing as though it’s a fad that has come and gone, we’re finding more interest from employers all the time. This may be because many like to brand it as another form of disruption, but regardless of how you brand it, reference based pricing is becoming a more important part of our value proposition all the time. It’s becoming more widespread because it enables a self-funded plan to limit costs to an extent that few other measures, if any, can match. This is primarily because by negotiating in advance with hospitals to accept a schedule of fixed payments for certain healthcare services, carrier-sponsored provider networks can be bypassed.

The fact is that while reference based pricing may be considered disruptive by many hospitals, it works. It is a transparent approach that can save a lot of money for self-funded health plans and their members. And finding ways to help self-funded employer plans provide high quality, high value healthcare to their members is our most important job.

ebso-self-funding-works

Jury deems Centura Health $230K surgical bill ‘unreasonable,’ awards $766

This article was published on June 21, 2018 on BenefitsPro, written by Greg Land. Photo Source: BenefitsPro.

hospital-bill-benefitspro

A Colorado jury declared a hospital’s billing unreasonable, turning aside its lawsuit demanding almost $230,000 from a patient whose insurer already covered the cost of her surgery.

The patient had already paid her deductible and her insurer had paid the hospital about $75,000, which an audit deemed the “reasonable value of the goods and services” she had been provided, her lawyer said.

Lead attorney Ted Lavender of FisherBroyles’ Atlanta branch, who represented the former patient with office partner Kris Alderman and Denver partner Frank Porada, said testimony in the case revealed just how murky hospital billing can be and how some patients are targeted for whopping bills to make up for those who pay substantially less for the same services.

“The hospital experts explained how the rates get set, and it ultimately devolved into this idea that paying patients have to pay more to make up for nonpaying patients, the uninsured, those on Medicare and Medicaid, who don’t pay full price,” Lavender said.

In his client’s case, records showed that surgical spinal implants cost the hospital about $31,000.

“They turned around and charged $197,640 for those items on the hospital bill,” said Lavender. “That is a 624 percent markup.”

The hospital is represented by Traci Van Pelt, Michael McConnell and David Belsheim of Denver’s McConnell Fleischner Houghtaling.

Van Pelt said they will file posttrial motions and appeal the verdict.

The case involved back surgery performed on Lisa French in 2014 at St. Anthony North Health Campus, north of Denver. Hospital filings said French’s surgery was to relieve back pain and was “considered elective.”

French’s employer had a self-funded ERISA insurance plan, and she was told prior to surgery that she would owe $1,336, of which she immediately paid $1,000.

French’s contract included phrasing that she “understand[s] that I am financially responsible to to the hospital or my physicians for charges not covered or paid pursuant to this authorization.”

St. Anthony’s billed her insurance plan $303,888 after the surgery and for two presurgical consultations based on its “chargemaster” billing schedule, an industrywide practice whereby providers list all the prices they charge.

As Lavender explained, French’s employer’s insurance plan contracts with a health care consulting firm, ELAP Services, which audits claim costs and negotiates with providers for self-funded insurers. On its website, ELAP says it “assists in plan design and jointly establishes limits for payment of medical claims that correlate to the providers’ actual cost of services.”

ELAP audited the fees St. Anthony’s charged French and determined that her actual charges came out to about $70,000, Lavender said. Between her co-pays and the insurance plan, St. Anthony’s was paid $74,597.

St. Anthony’s parent company, Centura Health Corp., sued French in state District Court in Adams County, Colorado, seeking an additional $229,112 in 2017.

ELAP provides legal representation to clients facing suit pursuant to its services, and Lavender, Alderman and FisherBroyles Denver partner Frank Porada were assigned French’s defense.

According to defense filings, Fishers contract with St. Anthony’s contained no stated price and was thus ambiguous.

The hospital was already paid the reasonable value for the services, according to a defense account. The chargemaster rates are “grossly excessive and defendant had no choice but to sign the Hospital Service Agreement, making them unconscionable” and thus unenforceable, the defense said.

During a six-day trial in Brighton, Colorado, before Judge Jaclyn Brown of Colorado’s 17th Judicial District, Lavender said the entire dispute was over the prices and methodologies medical providers use.

“We had one expert, and they had three,” said Lavender. “They spent $100,000 on experts.”

“The reality is that there’s nobody to say how much they’re charging is reasonable,” Lavender said.

The jury made that determination for French on June 11, answering “no” when asked whether her bills were reasonable. The panel agreed she had a contract with St. Anthony’s to pay “all charges of the hospital,” but that those charges were “the reasonable value of the goods and services provided,” not those set by the hospital’s chargemaster.

The jury awarded the hospital $766.74.

The hospital’s attorneys did a good job explaining how hospitals have to shoulder the burden for underpayments and nonpayment by other patients, Lavender said.

“They know they’re not going to collect from everybody,” he added. “But in the end, it just reveals how antiquated and nontransparent the system is, because nobody understands the bill.”

controlling-costs

Are Costs Really Beyond Anyone’s Control?

medical-moneyIn at least one big city, a major carrier is providing 100% coverage to public employees for MRIs, CT Scans and other imaging services only when free-standing, non-hospital based facilities are used. What do you know? Independent TPAs have been helping self-funded health plans do things like this for years.

Too many people have long considered rising health care costs to be a condition we simply must live with. Fact is there are alternatives, most of which can only be implemented when the plan’s best interests are first and foremost.

Detailed Reporting Needed

In contrast to a fully insured plan or self-funding with a carrier-owned ASO, using an independent TPA enables the plan to make informed decisions based on detailed reporting – reporting that the plan owns.

There is no secret to controlling plan costs. It requires discipline and the tools to monitor individual parts of the plan, such as prescription drugs, imaging, chronic disease management and more. Analyzing expenditures such as these can yield huge savings over the course of a year, but only when your administrator is free of carrier or provider affiliations. Having checks and balances in place can make all the difference.

ebso-self-funding-works

CMS Modifies Bundled Pay Requirements

ebso-bundled-paymentsWhile hospitals in 34 geographic areas will still be required to participate in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model, hundreds of acute care hospitals in other areas have received a reprieve. In addition to modifying CJR model compliance, CMS recently finalized plans to cancel the Episode Payment and Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment Models, both of which were scheduled to become effective on January 1, 2018.

While a number of hospitals will voluntarily participate in the CJR model and others have expressed interest to participate in the two cancelled models, the agency said there would not be enough time to restructure the models prior to the planned 2018 start date. Even though some have criticized the Trump administration for a lack of interest in value-based care, the administration has expressed a strong commitment to value-based payment, but says it prefers voluntary models.

ebso-self-funding-works

Commonsense Reporting Bill Introduced

commonsense-reportingIn October, a bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would ease the ACA reporting mandates for employer-sponsored health plans. The bill would roll back the reporting requirements of Section 6056 and replace them with a voluntary reporting system. The bill would also allow payers to transmit employee notices electronically rather than having to send paper statements by mail.

While self-funded health plans must now comply with Sections 6055 and 6056, it is not yet clear how the bill would affect Section 6055 requirements. Senators Rob Portman of Ohio and Mark Warner of Virginia, sponsors of the bill, say their proposal would give the government a more effective way of applying premium tax credits to consumers who purchase insurance through an Exchange, something the administration has been trying to accomplish.

ebso-self-funding-works