HSA Limits Increase for 2021

healthInflation-adjusted limits for contributions to health savings accounts and high deductible health plans for the coming year were just announced. According to the announcement, eligible individuals with self-only HDHP coverage will be able to contribute $3,600 to their HSA in 2021, an increase of $50 from 2020. Those with family coverage will be able to contribute $7,200 in 2021 and those who are 55 years of age or older will be able to make an additional “catch-up” contribution of $1,000 to their HSA.

While minimum deductibles for HDHPs will remain the same for 2021 plan years at $1,400 for self-only coverage and $2,800 for family coverage, the maximum limits for out-of-pocket expenses will increase to $7,000 for individual coverage and $14,000 for family coverage.

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No-Deductible COVID-19 Care

ebso-covidUninsured people needing medical treatment for the coronavirus will be able to get that treatment without concerns about out-of-pocket costs or unexpected charges. Thanks to the federal stimulus package passed by Congress in early April, hospitals and healthcare providers that treat these folks will be paid for unreimbursed care at current Medicare rates.

While the law does not require that health insurance carriers and employer-sponsored health plans waive cost-sharing charges such as deductibles and coinsurance for coronavirus patients requiring medical treatment, many groups are pushing for this relief. In response, some large insurance carriers and health plans have said they would waive out-of-pocket costs for in-network COVID-treatment through the end of May. Pressure for this relief is expected to mount as shutdowns of non-essential businesses continue and more and more workers are laid off or furloughed.

Relief for HDHPs and HSAs

In another emergency ruling, the IRS said that HSA users with high deductible health plan coverage can use their coverage to pay for testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 pneumonia, without having to be concerned about satisfying the minimum deductible requirements common to HSA coverage. The same flexibility will now also apply to HSA account holders who need to use their coverage to pay for treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia. The IRS has cautioned that this guidance only applies to the COVID-19 emergency and does not void the other requirements governing High Deductible Health Plans and Health Savings Accounts. Since regulations and requirements regarding benefits for COVID-19 continue to evolve rapidly, plan members are advised to consult their health plan before seeking testing or treatment.

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HSA, FSA Limits Rise in 2019

Each year, the IRS announces inflation-adjusted limits for HSA and FSA contributions as well as minimum deductibles and out-of-pocket levels for High Deductible Health Plans (HDHP). Based on their recent announcement, maximum contribution levels going into effect on January 1, 2019 are as follows:

HSA, FSA Limits

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Traditional Plans Decrease

stethescope for healthcareSince 2007, adults ages 18 to 64 with employment-based coverage have increasingly chosen High Deductible Health Plans (HDHP), both with and without Health Savings Accounts  (HSA), over traditional plans.

In 2017, the number enrolled in HDHPs without an HSA rose to 24.5%, while HDHPs with HSAs rose to 8.9%. Some employers are choosing to only offer HDHPs, helping shift employees away from traditional plans.

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